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Historic, archived document 



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scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 




y\ 

i v: JAN 29 1938 W 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY 

TED 
Bl 

WASHINGTON D C. 



) STATES DIPARTMZNT OF AGRjc&l^life? 
iUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

iHACUIKirTOM 1""* f~~ 1 ■ — 



Vol. 36 January 22, 1938 No. 3 



LATE CABLES. 



Belgium 1937 production estimates reported as follows, with 1936 
comparisons in parentheses: Wheat 15,542,000 bushels (16,152,000), rye 
3,582,000 (14,060,000), barley 3,950,000 (3,642,000), oats 35,825,000 
(38,110,000), potatoes 113,574,000 (118,512,000), flaxseed 551,000 bush- 
els (772,000), flax fiber 48,501,000 pounds (48,029,000), sugar beets 
1,517,000 short tons (1,644,000). (International Institute of Agricul- 
ture, Rome . ) 

Czechoslovakia winter acreages sown for harvest in 1938 estimated 
as follows, with 1936 figures in parentheses: Wheat 2,028,000 acres 
(1,994,000), rye 2,423,000 (2,358,000), barley 19,000 acres (19,000). 
(International Institute of Agriculture, Rome.) 



British Board of Trade announces cured pork import quota for 
period February 1 - April 30 will be 1,270,707 cwt . (142,319,000 pounds) 
for all foreign suppliers with the usual 8.1 percent allotment to the 
United States (11,528,000 pounds). The new quota represents a continu- 
ation of the January 1938 rate of permitted imports, but a reduction of 
3 percent from the rate prevailing during the comparable 1937 period. 
(Agricultural Attache C. C. Taylor, London.) 

London colonial wool sales, first series for 1938, opened January 
18 with good greasy merinos, 60 's and 70 ' s, 5 percent higher and superior 
greasy merinos 10 percent higher due to Soviet buying. Inferior greasy 
merinos and warp 60 's were 5 percent lower. Scoured merinos were very 
firm. Fine greasy crossbreds were 5 percent lower, but medium greasy 
crossbreds were 10 to 15 percent higher due to Soviet buying. Scoured 
crossbreds were par to 5 percent lower. Lamb's slipes were 5 percent 
and sheep's 5 to 10 percent higher. Withdrawals amounted to 5 percent. 
No American buying. Wool sales were resumed at Brisbane, Australia, on 
January 15, with offerings representing an average to ordinary selection. 
Continental European countries were chief buyers, and fair amount of 
competition developed. Compared with prices ruling at close on January 
13 of previous Brisbane sales, current prices were generally unchanged, 
but better class wools showed an easier tendency. (Agricultural Attache 
C. C. Taylor, London.) 



34 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 3 



GRAINS 

The,, Japa nese. whgat an d f lour ,mar~<e_t 



Price:: of domestic wheat and flour at Tokyo on January 4 showed 
an increase over those of tne previous month, but quotations of United States 
Australian, and Manchurian wheat declined, according to information fur- 
nished the Shanghai office, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, "by Consul 
General Charles R. Cameron at Tokyo. Western White continued to he the 
cheapest foreign wheat available, hut orders are dependent upon exchange 
control. The domestic ficur market was normal,, with export demand 
moderate. Mills were active, and stocks accumulated. Wheat was quoted 
at the mill on January 4 as follows, import duty and landing charges in- 
cluded: Western White No. 2, $1.41 per bushel; Canadian No. 1, $2.07, 
No. 3, $1.81; Australian $1.42; Manchurian $1.75 per bushel. Domestic 
standard was $1.30 and Portland wheat, c.i.f. Yokohama, $1.06 per bushel, 
duty and landing charges excluded. The wholesale price of flour at the 
mill was $1.39 per bag of 49 pounds; export flour, c.i.f. Dairen and 
Tangku (North China), $1.39. 



JAP Ail: Imports of wheat by countries of origin and total exports of 
flour., November and July- November 1936 and 1937. 



Country and item 



I mp orts of wheat 



United St a 

Canada. . . . 

Australia. 

Argentina.. 

China 

Manchuria. 
0 the r s . . . . 

Total. . . 



es 



Ex ports of flour 



November 



12 



slS. , 



1,000 huahajfl 



Q K 



128 
216 



l^non-banraia 



167 



1937 



j&QJaishala 



42 
170 
136 



66 



MA. 



1 , 00,0 barrel s 



350 



.Tuly^Wovember. 



1935. 



1937 



1 ,000' bushels 



129 


42 


1,629 


674 


507 


■870 




73 


615 


4 


343 


: 281 


62 






1,944 , 


Jliharxels 


1 , 000 barrels 


471 


ej 1,006 



a/ Of which 518,000 barrels went to North China. 

OILS AND OILSEEDS 

Chinese exports of oils, oilseeds increa se during 1936-57 

Exports of most vegetable oils and oilseeds from China during the 
1936-37 crop year exceeded those of the preceding season, according to a 
radiogram received from Cwen L. Dawson, Agricultural Commissioner at 
Shanghai. Exports of tung oil and cottonseed oil to the United States 
during the 1936-37 crop year were larger than, those of the previous 



Jenuary 22, 1939 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



35 



season, while exports of sesamum seed and peanut oil were smaller. Sesa.mum 
seed exports to the United States decreased as a result of the increase 
in excise taxes in August 1936. 

The 1937 Chinese sesamum seed and peanut crops wore reported 
very good, exceeding the 1936 production, while tung oil nuts and rape- 
seed were somewhat below the 1936 harvests. The 1937 cottonseed production 
is believed to be slightly below the large 1936 crop. 

Exports from China during t e 1937-38 crop year are expected to be 
materially reduced as a result of disrupted transportation, blockade of 
ports, and decrease in the world demand, If transportation facilities open 
up, an increase in exports will take pla.ce, as ample supplies are available 
in the interior. Home consumption of edible vegetable oils and oilseeds 
will be increased this season. 

CHINA.: Exports of vegetable oils and oilseeds, 



Item : Crop : Tata] To-Jj.ni.ted States 

j ygar j 1935-36 j 1936-57 : 1935-56 1936-37 

j j l.oco | l.oco : 1,000 i 1,000 

; I short tons: short tons; short tons; short tons 

Tung oil • Nov. -Cot. j 95 j 110 \ 67 ■ 78 

Sesamum seed. \ Oct. -Sept.; 113 i 115 i " 62 7 

Cottonseed j " j 51 ■ 149 : j 

Cottonseed oil. . .j 11 : 12 j 31 i 6 j 18 

Peanuts : j ! ! 

Kernels i " j 52 ! 53 j a/ a/ 

Unshelled j 11 : 30 ; 54 ; a/ a/ 

Oil j " • 29 ; 47 j 26 : 15 

Rapeseed j May-Apr. j 63 ? 15 | 



China Monthly Foreign Trade Returns, a/ Less than 500 short tons. 

kanchurian vegetable oils and oilseed export s 

Exports of Manchurian soybean oil, peanuts, periila seed, and 
hempseed decreased while exports of soybeans, cottonseed, and sesamum 
seed increased during the 1936-37 crop year (October-September) as com- 
pared with the preceding season, acceding to a radiogram received from 
Owen L. Dawson, Agricultural Commissioner at Shanghai. A large reduc- 
tion of exports to the United States of periila seed and hempseed took 
place during the 1936-57 season compared with the previous crop year. 
This reduction was the result of the increase in the United States ex- 
cise taxes. 

The 1937 Manchurian production of soybeans, hempseed, and peanuts 
are slightly above that of the previous year, while periila and cottonseed 
production was somewhat smaller. 



3<? 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, Wo. 3 



Exports of soybeans, hempseed, and peanut oil are expected to "be 
somewhat larger during 1937-38. The Government has "been making efforts 
to keep up the volume of soybean exports, and new mills in Dairen have 
begun pressing peanuts for exporting peanut oil abroad. Exports of 
perilla seed, cottonseed, and soybean oil are expected to be somewhat 
smaller during the 1937-38 crop year. 



MANCHURIA; Vegetable oil and oilseed exports, October-September, 
1935-36 pnrl 1936-3? 



Item 



Soybeans. . . . 
Soybean oil. 
Perilla seed 
Perilla oil. 
Hempseed. . . . 
Cottonseed. . 
Sesamum seed 
Peanuts: 

Kernels . . . 

Unshelled. 



1935-36 



Total 



1,000 

gj&art txms. 

2,048 
82 
131 
23 
68 
9 
1 

81 

23 



JL9. 36 -37, 



1,000 
short tons 
2,197 
72 
72 
24 
22 
17 
6 

72 
32 



To Uni ted S tates 

1935-36 ; 192^52. 



1 , 000 
short tons 

1 
41 

22 
41 



1,000 
short tons 

7 

a/ 
14 



Manchoukuo Monthly Foreign Trade Returns, a/ Less than 500 short tons. 

FRUITS , VEGETABLES, AND NUTS 
United States exports of canned grapefruit he avy 

Exports from the United States of canned grapefruit hearts and 
juice were near record proportions in the 1936-37 season, November to 
October. The total movement amounted to 1,130,030 cases (30 pounds) 
compared with 846,196 last season and with 1,159,311 cases in the rec- 
ord 1934-35 season. Exports were valued at $1,807,030. The value per 
case was $1.60, the lowest since 1932-33. The United Kingdom is by 
far the most important outlet, taking over a million cases in 1936-37. 
Canada, India., and the Irish Free State are the other most important 
markets. 

Briti sh Honduras d e velops grapefruit canning 

Around 5,000 cases of canned grapefruit and 4,000 gallons of bar- 
reled grapefruit juice are expected to be exported from the Stann Creek 
District of British Honduras in 1937-38, according to an official report 
published in the Weekly Fruit Intelligence Notes, London. Production of 
grapefruit is expected to be around 35,000 boxes. A crop of 1,200 boxes 
of oranges and other citrus is expected. The report predicts that an 
increasing percentage of the grapefruit crop will be canned each year. 



January 22, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



37 



UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA BANS COHN AITS SUGAR EXPORTS 

The Union of South Africa has placed an embargo on the important 
export commodities of corn and sugar, according to American Minister 
L. J. Kenna at Pretoria. This action has been taken because of serious 
drought conditions, and the purpose of both embargoes is to maintain 
sufficient reserves within the country to meet domestic demand until the 
next harvest. 

7/ith respect to corn, which yielded a. particularly large crop last 
season, it is estimated that exports up to the effective date of the em- 
bargo, December 15, 1937, amounted to 10,500,000 bags (of 200 pounds each). 
Prospects for the coming season are unsatisfactory, however, f^r the pre- 
vailing drought has caused planting to be deferred in many important corn 
areas, while crops in the ground have made little progress, and in seme 
area.s replanting will be necessary. See page 474 cf "Foreign Crops and 
Markets," December 31, 1937, for earlier statement on the South African 
drought . 



INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN COTTON 

Total exports of cotton from the six principal exporting countries 
from August 1 through November 30, 1937, amounted to 4,073,000 bales. 
This did not equal the exports for the same period of 1935 or 1936 and 
was 11 percent less than the 10-year average. Of particular interest was 
the increased share of total exports from the, six leading countries sup- 
plied by the United States — 64 percent as compared with 57 percent in the 
same period of 1936. The United States and Egypt arc exporting more cot- 
ten than last season, but British India, and Argentina are exporting very 
much less. 

United States : The United States exported 2,609,000 bales of raw 
cotton in the 4 months ended November 30, 1937, a gain of 198,000 bales 
or 8 percent as against the same period a year earlier. When compared 
with the 10-year average for those 4 months, exports represented a. decline 
of 24 percent. The United Kingdom again ranked first as a market for 
United States cotton, taking 789,000 bales, the largest since 1928, com- 
pared with 486,000 bales a year ago . Other countries which increased their 
takings of American cotton were France, Belgium, Netherlands, Sweden, 
Poland, and Canada. Exports to Japan dropped to 89,000 bales as against 
690,000 bales a year earlier. 

British India : Only one-half as much 'cotton has been exported 
from British India this season as last, the total standing at 304,000 
bales. The major part of the decrease occurred in exports to Japan, 
which dropped to 115,000 bales as against 382,000 bales last season. Ex- 
ports to the United Kingdom stood at 29,000 bales or less than one-half 
the volume sent to British markets in 1936. 



38 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 3 



INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN COTTON, CONT'D 

Egypt : Exports from Egypt amounted to 624 , GOO bales , second only 
to the peak reached in 1935. This represented a gain of 28 percent over 
the 1923-1932 average. Japan purchased only one-third the quantity taken 
in the same period of last season "but this loss was more than offset by 
heavier exports to G-ermany, France, Italy, and British India. 

Brazil : Exports from Brazil changed very little compared with 
those of a year earlier, the total amounting to approximately 363,000 
bales. This exceeded by 59,000 bales the total exports from British India. 

Peru and Argentina : From Peru, exports continued at a rather high 
level, not greatly below the peak reached in 1935. The United Kingdom 
and G-ermany absorb most of the Peruvian fiber. Because of a short crop, 
exports from Argentina reached the very low level of 15,000 bales. 



COTTON: Summary of world exports, average, August-November, 





1923-1932 


and 1934- 


19S7 










Aug 


j-st-November 




Exporting 


Quantity 














countries 


Average 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1937 




1923-1932 




1 , 000 


1,000 


' 1 , 000 


1 , 000 


1 ,000 




bales 


bales 


iaLe_s 


bales 


bales 


United States 


3,421 


1,993 


Ci , 1 <Co 


2,411 


2 , 609 


British India 


511 - 


507 


507 


615 


304 


Egypt 


486' 


585 


688 


557 


624 


Bra.zil 


41 


286 


203 


365 


a/ 363 


Peru. 


101 


141 


174 


156 


158 


Argentina 


37 


59 


75 


89 


15 


Total 


4,597 


3,571 


4.369 


4.193 


4,073 






Pe 


rcentaee of total 






Percent 


Percent. 




Percent, 




United States. 


74 


56 


62 


57 


... 64 


British India 


11 


14 


12 


15 


8 


Egypt 


11 


16 


16 


13 


15 


Brazil . . . 


1 


: 8 


4 


9 


9 


Peru 


2 


: 4 


4 


i 4 


4 


Argentina 


* 1 
X 


2 


2 


2 


U— 


Total 


100 


; loo 


100 


; ioo 


100 



Compiled from official sources. 

a/ Exports for November estimated at 75,000 bales, 
b/ Less than 0.5 percent. 



January 22, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



39 



INTENTIONAL TRAPS IN COTTON, CONT'D 



COTTON: Destination of exports from the principal exporting countries, 
average 1923-1932, and seasons 1935-1937 a/ 



Destination 
of exports 



Augu s t - No v emb e r 



Quantity 



from principal 
exporting 


Average 
1923- 


1935 


1936 


1937 


Average 
1923- 


1935 


1936 


1937 


countries 


1932 








1932 








Exoorts from the 


1,000 


1,000 


1 , GOO 


1,000 










United States to 


bales 


"bales 


bales 


bales 


Percent 


Percent 


Percent 


Percent 


Germany* 


880" 


331 


300' 


430 


26 


12 


12 


16 


United Kingdom 


756 


668 


486 


789 


22 


25 


20 


30 




418 


331 


388 


444 


12 


12 


16 


17 




263 


172 


118 
b/ 


234 


8 


6 


5 


9 




X OX 


92 


0 


4 


3 


c/ 


0 




77 


83 


68 


91 


2 


3 


3 


4 


TT.S S R- 














/ 

c/ 




I T?" 1 c C 1 O ] f\ 1 


6? 


0 


i 

X 


b/ 


0 


0- 


c/ 




O O 




32 


~65 


2 


1 


~ l 




-m ^ o v 
OWUiltJi. • • • ■ • • • 


PR 




4? 


45 


1 


1 


2 


2 


PoT"hi] r*ri 1 

1 v 1 V VrfCf-jCJ-.L • * * • • 


18 


25 


15 


14 


c/ 
c/ 


1 


1 


i 


Pnl n nn "Hp ri 17 -i r 


7 


1?5 

X C< O 


85 


107 


5 


4 


4 


Other Europe . 


25 


47 


54 


98 


1 


2 


2 


3 


Total Europe 


2,721 


1,946 


1,589 


2,315 


30 


rl 


66 


39 


WClIlCVXc I ••••••• 


7 r ^ 




1 04 


1 O'S 


2 


3 


4 


4 






coo 


fiQO 

O 3U 






24 


29 


3 

c/ 


P.Vt i no 






4 


b/ 




1 


0/ 
c/ 


British India 


13 


3 


4 


49 


2/ 


c/ 


2 


Other countries 


5 


11 


20 


51 


c/ 


1 


1 


2 


Total 


3 , 421 


2,722 


2,411 


2,609 


roc 


ICO 


i: . 


100 


3ritish India to 


















Janan 


217 


261 


382 


115 


42 


52 


62 


38 


Italy 


69 


37 


30 


; 28 


13 


7 


5 


9 




50 


7 


3 


25 


10 


1 


1 


8 


Germany 


44 


46 


34 


: 27 


9 


3 


6 


9 




43 


33 


46 


: 30 


8 


7 


7 


10 










United Kingdom 


33 


61 


69 


: 29 


6 


12 


.11 


10 




27 


15 


: 14 
: W 

7 


: 11 

j If d 

'• e/ 5 


5 


3 
2 


2 


4 




13 
7 


12 

6 


■7 


: c/ 

1 


c/ 

1 


Netherlands . . 


1 


1 


Other countries 


j 3 


28 


30 


: 34 


3 


: 6 


5 


11 




511 


507 


615 


304 


100 


100 


: 100 


100 



Percentage of total 



* Includes shipments through the free port of Bremen, much of which is afterward 
reshipped to other countries. According to German official trade returns, import: 
of American cotton for consumption in Germany amounts to 111,000 "bales in August- 
November, 1937; 61,000 bales in 1936; and 130,000 in 1935. 



40 



Foreign Crops and Markets 
IOTERMJHOKAL TRADE IN COTTON, CONT'p 



Vol. 36, No. 3 



COTTON: Destination of exports from the principal exporting countries, 
average 1923-1932, and seasons 1935-1937, cont'd 



Destination 
of exports 



Au gu s t - N o v em b e r 



Quantity- 



Percentage of total 



from principal 


Average 








Average 








exporting 


19 23- 


1935 


1936 


1937 


1923- 


1935 


1936 


1937 


countries 


1932 








1932 








Til ~v~y~\ n iif c t ' 7 * c \ m 
Jh^pU 1 0 b 11 um 


1 , 000 


1 , 000 


1 , 000 


1 , 000 










O" I- ^ ^ ^ 




baLejs,. 


b_aLe_s. 


Ja&lejs 


1 erceni 


x ere eiiij 




I fcl O Kill; 


TT"n 1 t TT-i n o*H 07*1 

vJxJ.J_ 0 C/U ^i- J_ ii^.^LViit 


Cj \j X 


p^o 


Pi 8 


P05 


41 




39 


33 


*H 1 T*'a ri p d 




00 


DU 




1 7 

lu 


1 P 


J- J- 


_L 


T TvV "i 4"'"ii^3 V"ro4"(^o 

Ulil 0 c;CX O U d O tJS 


52 


16 


13 


14 


XX 


2 


2 


2 


Spr^Tl^'P' 7 " 


32 


62 


43 


81 


7 


Q 


8 


13 




31 


64 


22 


42 


c 

D 


. 9 


4 


7 


qwx u z er.Lanu. . . 


22 


24 


26 


28' 


0 


4 


5 


4 




21 


43 


52 


18 


A 


6 


9 


T7 
O 


n c; 0 13 








^ xtus sxelj . • • 


21 


fl 


f/ 


f/ 


/ 










16 


38 


0 


1 




5 


0 




C z echo Slovakia 


10 


27 


23 


23 


0 


4 


4 


4 


British India. 


4 


28 


25 


41 


1 


4 


4 


7 


Poland 8c Danzig 


; 4 


12 


11 


11 


1 


0 


2 


2 


Other countrie 


3 7 


61 


64 


66 


2 


10 


12 


10 


Total 


486 


688 


557 


624 


100 


100 


100 


100 




Augus 


4- Pi ^ 4- ✓ 

t-UCtODC 


sr 




Average 








Average 










1923- 


1935 


1936 


1937 


1923- 


1935 


1936 


1937 




1932 








1932 








Brazil to 






















109 


77 


124 




69 


27 


43 


United Kingdom 




23 


97 


62 




14 


34 


21 






1 


64 


55 




1 


22 


19 






7 


8 


10 




4 


3 


3 


Poland 




b/ 


5 


f 




c/ 


2 


3 






4 


0 


7 




0 


1 


2 


Netherlands . . 




6 


11 


6 




4 


4 


2 


B e 1 g i um- Lux em 




4 


5 


4 




3 


2 


2 






3 


9 


3 




2 


3 


1 


Other countries 


1 


6 


10 . 




1 


2 


,1 
-± 


Total 


g/ 26 


158 


285 


288 


100 


100 


100 


100 



Compiled from official sources. a/ Bales of 478 pounds net except for the 
United States which are in baJ.es of 500 pounds gross, b/ Less than 500 bales. 
cj Less than 0.5 percent, &/ Beginning January 1, 1935, includes Russia in 
Asia. e/ Three months, August-October. f/ If any, included in "Other countrie; 
g/ No data available by countries. 



January 22, 1938 Foreign Crops and Markets 41 



WHEAT: Closing Saturday prices of May futures 



Date 


Chi cago 


Kansa 


s City 


Minneapolis 


Winnipeg a/ 


Liverpool a/ 


i Buenos 
Aires b/ 




1936 


: 1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 :1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 




Cents 


' Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents ' Cents 


Cnnt s 


Cents. 


Cents 


Cents 


High cj ... 


136 


; 109 


13C 


104 


144 


114 


129 : 130 


133 


130 


a/ioi 


e/114 


Low cj. . . . 


112 


; 87 


108 


83 


121 


93 


106 : 105 


110 


109 


a/ 97 


e/ 98 


Dec. 25. . . 


136 


i 22 


130 


90 


144 


100 


129 : 118 


129 


111 


d/ 99 


d/102 


31. . . 


135 


90 


130 


87 


144 


98 


129 : 118 


133 


no 


d/100 


d/104 




1937 


:1938 


1937 


1938 


1937 


:. . 


1937 .1938 


1937 


1938 


1937 


1938 


Jan . 8 . . . 


134 


: 98 


126 


96 


142 


107 


129 : 130 


131 


115 


d/ 98 


d/lll 


15. . . 


133 


97 


126 


96 


140 


106 


125 125 


125 


115 


a/ 98 d/in 



a/ Conversions at noon "buying rate of exchange, b/ Prices are of day previous to 
other prices, cf October 1 to date, d/ March futures, e/ February and March 
futures . 



WHEAT: Weighted average cash price at stated markets 



"7eek 
ended 



All classes 
and grades 
six markets 



1936.1937 



No. 2 
Hard Winter 
Kansas City 



1936 .1937 



No. 1 
Dk.N. Spring 
Minneapolis 



1936 .'1937 



No. 2 Hard 
Ar.be r Durum 
Minneapoli s 



1936 1937 



No 
Red 
St. 



. 2 

winter 
Louis 



1936 '1937 



Western 

White 
Seattle a/ 



1935 :1937 



High b/.. 
Low b / . . . 
Dcc.~25. . 
31. . 

Jan . 8 . . 



>nts . Cents 



150 
126 
145 
149 



110 
91 

96 



Cents 
143 
120 
141 
143 



Cents 



111 

92 
96 
96 



:ents 
176 
139 
163 
176 



Cents 
133 
109 
122 



Cents 
183 
143 
178 

180 



1937 .1938 



1937 



1937 -1938 



1937 



150 
148 



101 

105 



141 
140 



167 
16 



12t 
131 



180 
16 



Cents 
110 
98 
103 
105 



Cents 
143 
118 
141 
143 



1938 



1937 



109 



143 
141 



)nts 



112 

86 
95 
95 



115 
96 
114 
115 



Cents 
95 
82 
86 
85 



1938 



1937 



1938 



97 
102 



114 
114 



87 



a/ Weekly average cf aaily cash quotations, basis No. 1 sackea. b/ October 1 tc 



dst 



•oducticn of specif iea crops, 1931-1937 



Year 


Wheat 


Hye 


Barley 


Oats 


Flaxseea 


Potatoes 




1 , 000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




• bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


1931 


. j 13,817 


20 , 482 


4,018 


48 , 384 


326 


131,426 


1932 


. ; 15,376 


23,662 


: 4,701 


52,335 


202 


163,104 


1933 


. j 15,067 


22,310 


j 4,613 


57,216 


239 


135,555 


1934 


. 1 16,757 


15,268 


: 3,837 


42,111 


337 


119,851 


1935 


. : 16,102 


12,995 


3,827 


38,106 


430 


110,493 


1936 


. i 16,152 


14,060 


.! 3,642 


38,110 


• 772 


118,512 


1937 


15.542 


13,582 


3 , 950 


35.825 


551 


113,574 



International Institute cf Agriculture, Home. 



42 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 3 



FEED GRAINS AND RYE: Weekly average price per bushel of corn, rye, 
oats, and barley at leading markets a/ 



Corn 



Week 
ended 



High b/ 
Low b/" • 



Dec, 



18. 
25. 



Jan . 1 . 



15. 



Rye 



Chicago. 



Sueno s Aire§Mi nneapol i s 



No . 3 
Yellow 



123c 



Cents 
118 ' 

59 

107. 

108 

1937 



103 
112 
112 



1937 



Cerit^s 

i'38 
53 

.58 
58 



1938 



59 
61 
59 



Features 



1936 1937 



Cent s 
111" 
101 
May 
103 
104 



1937 



105 
110 
111 



Cents 
62 
56 
May 
59 
60 



1938 



62 
62 
61 



Futures 



No. 2 



1936 . 1937 '1936 



C ents 
" 50 
48 
Feb. 

50 
49 



1937 



50 
49 
50 



C ent s 'C ent s 
""90" :"ll7. 



64 
Feb. 

73 
75 



48 

11.3 
115 



1938 ,1937 
117' 
116 
113 



80 
87 
90 



1937 



Cents 
.117 
67 

70 
70 



1938 



72 
76 
77 



Oats 



Chicago 



No. 3 
White 



1936 
C ent s 
~" 55 
25 

52 
52 



1937 



53 
55 
53 



1937 
C ent s 
" 55 
30 

32 
32 



1938 



33 
33 
34 



Barley 



Minneapolis 



No. 2 



1936 



Cent s 
"133 
58 

131 
127 



1937 



130 
129 
128 



1937 



Cents 
137 
61 



73 
75 



1938 



77 
78 

80 



a/ Cash prices are weighted averages of reported sales; future prices are simple 
averages of daily quotations, b/ For period January 1 to latest date shown. 

FEED GRAINS: Movement from principal exporting countries 



Commodity 
and 
country 



Exports 
for year 



Shipments 1938. 
week ended a/ 



935-36 


1936-37 


Jan. 1 


Jan. 8 


Jan. 15 


July 1 
to 


1936-37 

b/ 


1937-38 
b/ 


1,000 


1 , 000 


1 , 000 


1,000 


1 , 000 






1 , 000 


1,000 


bushels 


bushels 


bushel s 


bushels 


bushels 






bushels 


bushels 


""97386 


5,153 


69 


"~l2l 


1,156 


Jean . 


15 


3,938 


' 8,364 


6, 882 


18,880 








Dec. 


31 


16,388 


3,389 


9,994 


14,668 


0 


345 


381 


Jan. 


15 


4,903 


1,526 


41 , 090 


26,315 


433 


633 


92 


J an. 


15 


21 , 303 


16,435 


67,852 


65,016" 










46 , 532 


34,714 


1 , 429 


912 


21 


0 


135 


Jan.- 


15 


378 


5,952 


15,615 


10,690 








Dec 


31 


7,842 


4,58.1 


10,355 


24,600 


0 


896 


1,984 


Jan- 


15 


7,559 


13,582 


1,390 


940 


0 


0 


0 


Jan. 


15 


800 


16C 


29,289 


37,142 










16,579 


2 4,275 












Oct. 


1 to 






867 


432 


715 


1,856 


1 , 524 


Jan. 


15 


90 


8,757 


14,321 


25,835 


34 


0 


137 


J an. 


15 


7,679 


274 


297,387 


401,722 


3,134 


1,139 


1,307 


Jan. 


15 


127 , 343 


72,321 


10 , 239 


23,146 


0 


0 


0 


Jan. 


15 


3,891 


20,958 


322,814 


451,135 










139,003 


102.31C 




103,643 








Nov. 


30 


14,385 


1,356 



Exports as far 
as reported 



BARLEY , EXPORTS : 

United States. 

Canada 

Argentina 

Danube & U.S.S 

Total 

OATS, EXPORTS: 

United States. 

Canada 

Argentina 

Danube & U.S.S 

Total 

CORN, EXPORTS: d/ 

United States. 

Danube & U.S.S 

Argentina 

South Africa. . 
Total 

United States 
imports . . . . . . 



R 



/ 



R 



Compiled from official and 
nearest to the date shown, 
ginning October 1. 



trade sources- a/ The weeks shown in these 
b/ Preliminary, c/ Year beginning July 1. 



d/ Year be- 



January 22, 1938 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



43 



EXCLA2IGE RASES: Average weekly and monthly values in Now York of 
specified currencies, January 15, 1938, with comparisons a/ 



Country 



Monetary 
Unit 



Month 



! 1 Q7=; 






1 qw 






193fl 


; Dec . 


Dec. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Dec . 

31 b/ 


Jan . 

8 


Jan . 
15 


1 Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


i 32.85 


32.72 


33.03 


33.31 


33.31 


33.31 




33 . 32 


■ 99.05 


100.06 


100.02 


100.07 


99.95 


99.86 


99.96 


99.98 


j 29.45 


29.53 


29.46 


29.44 


29.47 


29.46 


29.47 


29.46 


: 22.00 


21.91 


22.12 


22.30 


22.30 


22 . 31 


22.32 


22.31 


:492.88 


490.78 


495.51 


499.61 


499.64 


499.71 


500.15 


499.75 


: 6.60 


4.67 


3.35 


3 • 2 9 


3.39 




3.40 


3.35 


; 40.22 


40.23 ' 


40.16 


40.36 


40.30 


40.28 


40.29 


40.28 


: 8.08 


5.26. 


5.26 


5.26 


5.26 


5.26 


5.26 


5.26 


: 28.74 


28.51 


28.85 


29.09 


29.08 


29.07 


29 .10 


29.05 


; 27.77 


27.75 


27.75 


27.75 


27.75 


27.75 


27.75 


27.75 


1 67.77 


54.57 


55.28 


55.45 


55.60 


55.62 


55.68 


55.67 


| 24.76 


24.66 


24.90 


25.10 


25.10 


25.11 


25.13 


25.11 


| 25.41 


25.30 


25.55 


25.75 


25.75 


25.76 


25-78 


25.76 


32.43 


22.98 


23.02 


23.15 


23.12 


23.12 




23.12 



k ended 



Argent ina. . . 


Paper peso . . 


Canada ....... 


, Dollar 


China 


Shang . yuan . 


Denmark. .... 


Krone 


England 


Pound 


France 




Germany 


Reichsmark. . 


Italy/. 




Japan 




Mexico 


Peso 


Netherlands . 




Norway 




Sweden 


Krcna 


Swit zerland. 


Franc 



Friday, due to holiday Saturday. 



transfers, b/ Week ended 



WHEAT, INCLUDING- FLOlt:: Shipments from principal exporting countries, 
as given "by current trade sources, 1935-55 to 1937-38 



Country 



Total 
shipments 



.1935-36 :1 936-3 



Shipments 1938, 

week ended 

Jan 



Jan . 1 Jan . 



Shipments 
Jul y 1-Jan.l ; 
1936-37 ,1937-35 



North America a/. 



: 1,000 
."bushels 



1,000 
bushels 



1,000 
bushels 



1,000 
bushels 



225,902 



;220,464 

Canada. ' 

4 markets b / . £46,199 

United States c_/ i 7,219 

Argentina j 78^312 164,678 

Australia 110,576 105,836 

U.S.S.R j 29,024 

Danube and 3ulgaria d/... : 8,312 

British India c/ ■ 2,556 

Total e/ :4 49,244 575,72 ? 

Total European 



194,531 
' 10,049 



88 

65,544 
14^674 



3,080 

566 
1,899 
1,108 
3,164 

0 

488 
160 



shipments a/ £60,264 

Total ex-European 

sh ipments a/.. 131.760 



'484,600 
127 , 192 



7,064 
1 ,584 



1,000 
bushels 



3, 635 

651 
1,993 
1,048 

802 
1,239 

545 
O 



1,000 
bushels 



1,000 
bushels 



4,155 

513 
2,151 
1 , 656 
3,591 

288 
288 
192 



153,542 

157,298 
5,321 
44,924 
40,040 
88 

43,384 
7,064 



102,966 

60,513 
40,762 
22 , 600 
42 , 845 
31 , 559 
25,745 
10.490 



289.042 g 56, 205 



TJ 



211,816 186,896 



7Q.55Q, 



44,535 



Compiled from official and trade sources. 

b/ Fort William, Port Arthur, Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and New Westminster, 
c/ Official, d/ Black Sea shipments only, e/ Total of trade figures includ 
North America as reported by 3roomhall. f/ To January 1. 



Broomhall's Corn Trade News. 

te: 

figures includes 



44 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 36, No. 3 



index 



Page 

Late cables 33 : - 



Bar lev: i- 

Area (winter); Czechoslovakia, ; . : 

x P "5 "7 » 1 33 - j •••••••••••••••••••••• 33* * 

Production, Belgium, 1931-1937 33, 4l- : 

Corn, export embargo, Union of . ■ : 

South Africa, Dec. 15, 1937 37. : 

Cotton, international trade, .. . : 

November 1937... 37-Uo. : 

Cottonseed: . : 

Exports, 1236,1937: .: 

Oli xricL* * * #' ••«■»••••• « •••«••••••■ 35"* 

Manchuria 36 : 

Cottonseed oil, exports, China, .: 

I^o.IQ?? 35- 

Exchange rates, foreign, . : 

Jan. "15, 193S... . ... 43 l 

El a:: fiber, production, Belgium, : 

1536,1937.. 33 : 

Flaxseed, production, Belgium, : 

1936,1937 33 M : 

Grains, feed: : 

Movement , principal countries, : 

Jan. 15, 1938 42 : 



Prices, principal markets, 

Jan. 15, 19' 7 'S 42 

Grapefruit (canned): 

Export prospects, British 

Honduras, 1937~3^ 36 



Export s , IT. S . , 1935^] 937 36 

Hempsoed, exports, Manchuria, 

1936,1937/ 36 

Oats, production, Bel g ium , 

1931-1937 33 ,Ui 

Peanuts : 

Exports, 1936,1937: 

OliijT.'). . «•••••••••••••••••«•••*•« 3o 

Manchuria 36 

Perilla oil, exports, Manchuria, 

1936,1937.....' 36 

Perilla seed, exports, Manchuria, 

1936,1937 36 



Page 

Pork, import quotas, U.K., 

Feb. 1-Apr. 30, 19^8 33 



Potatoes, production, Belgium, 

1931-1937 1 • 33,41 

Raneseed, exports, China, 

1936, 1937. ... 35 

Eve: 

Area (winter), Czechoslovakia, 
■1937.1933 33 

Production, Belgium, 1931-1937' 33.41 
Sesamum seed: 

Exports, 1936,1937: • 

China 35 

■ Manchuria. ... c 3t> 

Soybeans, exports, Manchuria, 

1936,1937.. 36 

Soybean oil, exports, Manchuria, 

1936,1937 ;. 36 

Sugar, export embargo, Union of 

South Africa, Dec. lo, 1937 37 

Sugar beets, production, 

Belgium, 1936,1937 33 

Tung oil, exports, China, 1936,1937 35 
Wheat: 

Area (?finter), Czechoslovakia, 

1937,19^3 33 

Exp 0 r t s (flour), J ap an , 

November 1937 • 34 

Imports, Japan, November 1937 •••» 34 

Market conditions, Japan, 

Jan. 4, 193S 34 

Prices: 

Japan, Jan. 4, 1938 34 

Specified markets, 

Jan. 10, 193S 4l 

Production, Belgium, 1931-1937 33. 4l 
Shipments, principal countries, 

Jan. 15, 193S 43 

Wool: 
Sale s : 

Br i sb ane , Au s t r al i a , 

Jan. lo, 193S 33 

London, Jan. IS, 1 C ;^S 33